Lundquist Institute Investigators Contribute to Global Study Expanding Genomic Research Into Different Ancestries

Paper in Nature Genetics: Genome-wide Meta-Analysis Shows That Research into Different Ancestries Leads to Better Results and Better Care

LOS ANGELES — Today The Lundquist Institute announced that its investigators contributed data from several studies, including data on Hispanics, African-Americans and East Asians, to the international MAGIC collaboration, composed of more than 400 global academics, who conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis led by the University of Exeter. Now published in Nature Genetics, their findings demonstrate that expanding research into different ancestries yields more and better results, as well as ultimately benefitting global patient care.

Lundquist Institute Investigator Wei Yan, MD, PhD, Solves Longstanding Fallopian Tube Transport Debate

Yan Group’s Research Shows That Motile Cilia Are Key to Oocyte Pickup in the Fallopian Tube

Unlike the normal Fallopian tube (left), the "cilia-less" Fallopian tube fails to pick up ovulated eggs, leading to female infertility (right). Art by Tingting Xie.

LOS ANGELES — Today, The Lundquist Institute announced that Wei Yan, MD, PhD, and his research group have solved a longstanding mystery and scientific debate about the mechanism underlying the gamete and embryo transport within the Fallopian tube. Using a mouse model where the animals lacked motile cilia in the oviduct, Dr.

Lundquist Institute Investigator Ashraf Ibrahim, PhD, Leads Life-Saving Research on Mucormycosis, the Deadly “Black Fungus”

Dr. Ibrahim’s start-up Vitalex Biosciences is manufacturing humanized monoclonal antibodies that would stem the spread of this fatal disease

LOS ANGELES — The Lundquist Institute today announced that one of its spinoff start-up companies, Vitalex Biosciences, founded by researcher Dr. Ashraf Ibrahim, is producing an antibody that stems the spread of mucormycosis, a deadly fungal infection with an overall mortality rate of 50% and higher. Mucormycosis is an emerging infection caused by exposure to mucor, a mold commonly found in soil, plants, manure, and decaying fruits and vegetables.